Advice On Healthy Eating: Tips For Eating Out




Need helpful advice on healthy eating for when you are eating out?

If you are a health-conscious eater, then you should always think about eating healthy even while eating out. Your health is important, so watching out what you eat is a vital part of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Here’s food for thought! Did you know the average restaurant meal has over 1,000 calories? That’s enough to blow any healthy eating plan. Fortunately, by following a few simple guidelines, you can dine out without having to sacrifice good taste and nutrition. Read on for the best advice on healthy eating for better eating out experience!

Here are some tips for eating healthy while eating out:

1. Avoid ordering an appetizer. It’s a little known fact that some appetizers have more calories and fat than the main course. Plus, many appetizers are fried and served with heavy sauces which will add to your intake of saturated fat as well as trans fats and calories. It’s not a healthy way to start your meal.

2. Say “yes” to salad. Salad is a healthy eater’s best friend. Not only will it fill you up so you’ll consume fewer calories overall, but it will also give you a hefty dose of antioxidants which are heart healthy. Be sure to ask your waitress to hold the croutons and cheese which will further reduce your caloric load. Also, choose your dressing wisely. Avoid cream based dressings and go for the vinegar based ones. You also have the option of using vinegar and olive oil which is heart healthy.

3. Make the right entree selection. Go for broiled and grilled rather than fried. Not only will you save calories and fat grams, you’ll also avoid trans fats which are so prevalent in fried foods. Instead, consider asking for a doubles order of vegetables with your entree. Very few Americans are getting the 7-9 servings of fruits and vegetables recommended for optimal health. Plus, by avoiding the starch, you’ll be reducing your caloric and carbohydrate load. Also, stick to tomato based sauces rather than cream based and you’ll enjoy a considerable calorie savings. Lastly, ask for the sauce to be served in a separate dish on the side so you can control the amount you eat.

4. Think about what you’re drinking with your meal. By not ordering an alcoholic beverage, you’ve saved yourself a considerable number of calories. Try sipping iced tea sweetened with a noncaloric sweetener, a diet soft drink, or water with lemon. You’ll be glad you did when you consider the calorie savings.

5. Indulge your sweet tooth wisely. Many of the chain restaurants now offer a low fat or low carbohydrate dessert selection such as a low carb cheesecake. These are wise choices for the health conscious eater and still allow you to end the meal on a sweet note. If a healthy dessert option isn’t available, try a cup of coffee with skim milk to help satiate your desire for something sweet.

6. Learn to control your portions. Many restaurants are serving larger quantities of food than in the past. If this is the case, put aside a portion of your entree at the beginning of the meal to take home with you. If you remove it from your plate before you start eating, you’ll be less tempted to overindulge.

We hope that you found our advice on healthy eating helpful for when you are eating out. By following these steps, you can make your dining experiences not only healthy, but enjoyable. Your heart will thank you! Eat healthy, stay happy!

Why Choose Low Glycemic Foods?




Why should you choose low-glycemic foods?

If you are asking yourself about the difference between low and high glycemic foods, then you must be a concerned, health-conscious individual. Some currently popular eating plans like The Perricone Prescription, A Week in the Zone and The Protein Power Lifeplan recommend low glycemic foods.

The theory is that sugar and high glycemic carbs that rapidly convert to sugar trigger a release of insulin to control the level of sugar in the bloodstream. Excess sugar in the bloodstream is inflammatory and causes a cascade of free radical damage.

To explain how dangerous this is, Dr, Perricone points out that diabetics with poorly controlled blood sugar age one third faster than nondiabetics and are prone to kidney failure, blindness, heart attack and stroke.

So insulin comes to the rescue to clear the excess sugar from the bloodstream. And what do you suppose the insulin does with all this sugar? It stores it as fat. And worse yet, until the insulin sweeps up the excess sugar, it runs rampant throughout the body causing glycation and cross-linking of the body’s collagen.

The effect is visible on the skin, which becomes leathery and inflexible as we age. Though it can’t be seen, the same damage is taking place inside the body where it affects other vital organs including the kidneys, lungs and brain.

So far, so good. Nutritionists have recommended that people cut their consumption of sugar for decades. The surprise when one ranks sugars and carbs by their glycemic index, is that some foods we normally think of as healthy show up as being bad for you.

The glycemic index is a ranking from 1 to 100, with 100 indicating the increase in blood sugar from eating table sugar (or white bread in one scale). Whichever scale is used, the important thing is a rank ordering of a food’s effect on blood sugar.

The low glycemic food diets mentioned above have different cut off points. For example, Dr. Perricone’s 28-day program prohibits any foods that score above 50 on the glycemic scale. That leaves out such things as bananas, bagels, carrots, corn, potatoes, rice and watermelon.

You can read more about the glycemic index (GI) and view the whole table http://www.mendosa.com/gi.htm here. This site is authored by David Mendoza, a freelance medical writer and consultant specializing in diabetes. The site is a gold mine of information.

Mr. Mendoza points out that a food’s glycemic index tells you how rapidly a particular carb turns into sugar, but not how much of that carbohydrate is in a serving. In other words, it’s not just the quality of the carb, but also the quantity, that counts.
The version of glycemic index on his site (courtesy of Professor Jennie-Brand Miller of the University of Sydney) includes a column called glycemic load (GL) as well as a column of serving size in grams. A glycemic load of 20 or more is considered high; 11 to 19 is medium; and 10 or less is low.

Looking at this bigger picture, some of the “bad” carbs in low-glycemic food diets turn out to be not so bad. A 120g serving of watermelon has a horrible GI of 74 but a very low GL of 4. A medium banana (129g) has a bad GI of 51 but a medium GL of 13. An 80g serving of carrots has a borderline GI of 47 but a low GL of only 3. The same amount of corn has a GI of 47 but a low GL of 7.

On the other hand, some carb foods look bad whether you go by the GI or the GL. A 70g bagel has a high GI (72) as well as a high GL (25). A 150g serving of boiled white rice has a GI of 56 and a GL of 24. A medium baked potato (159g) has a high GI (60) and a marginal GL (18).

If you decide to concentrate on low-glycemic foods, I recommend you focus on a food’s glycemic load. Just be careful to adhere to the indicated serving sizes (or adjust the calculation accordingly), GL is a better measure of how much sugar in total is being poured into the bloodstream and the amount of sugar that will be stored as fat.

This article is for informational purposes only. It does not purport to offer medical advice.

Advice On Healthy Eating: Tips To Improve Eating Habits Fast




Seeking advice on healthy eating for tips to improve eating habits fast?

Find free advice on healthy eating to learn easy tips to improve eating habits fast. Your health should be one of the most important thing to maintain. Americans, now more than ever, recognize the need to change the way they eat. From reducing fat and sugar intake to cutting carbs, many are looking for extra steps they can take in the kitchen to improve their overall health.

In fact, a recent survey administered by Opinion Research highlights this trend, revealing that 86 percent of Americans believe there are dietary changes they could be making to improve their well-being. Despite this desire to take the necessary steps, 63 percent indicated they still struggle with ways to eat healthier.

When it comes to specific reasons behind the difficulty in changing cooking and eating habits, 70 percent of respondents believed eating healthier will prevent them from enjoying their favorite foods, followed by a belief that eating healthy takes too much time (59 percent) and a fear that choosing healthy foods will change the taste of what they eat (51 percent).

“Americans today are really open to advice and solutions on how they can improve their eating habits and live longer, healthier lives. While the majority of us desire improved health and wellness, we all know it’s tough to break everyday patterns that require giving up our favorite foods,” said Crystal Harrell, Ph.D., Procter & Gamble Health Sciences Institute.

Achieving healthy eating is easier than most realize, according to Harrell. Whether picking up food at the grocery store or through the drive-thru, Americans can take simple steps to make their food choices healthier-without sacrificing time, flavor and any other concerns they may have.

One easy way to add more health to your diet is to increase fiber intake. While research indicates fiber may help prevent a variety of health conditions, 95 percent of Americans today are not consuming their daily fiber requirements. The National Fiber Council recommends people receive 32 grams or more of fiber per day; however, according to Columbia University, typical consumption of fiber averages 10 grams to 15 grams daily. That’s less than half the recommended allowance.

Jackie Newgent, a registered dietitian and chef, offers the following tips on easy ways to add more fiber to your diet:

1) Next time you order pizza, forgo sausage or pepperoni and create a “salad” pizza instead-choose vegetables like artichokes, onions and tomatoes. Try whole wheat crust, too.

2) If you’re more in the mood for Chinese, choose steamed tofu and vegetables over fried meat dishes. Request brown rice in place of white, too.

3) Always have some cans of beans on hand. Use them in your favorite soup, salad or pasta sauce for a quick fiber fix.

4) Feel like having fruit juice? Drink water to quench your thirst, then enjoy a whole piece of fruit for extra fiber and chewing satisfaction.

5) Incorporate a fiber supplement such as Fibersure into your meals. From the makers of Metamucil, it’s an all-natural, clear-mixing powder that’s flavor-free, nonthickening and quickly dissolves in water or most other liquids and won’t change the flavor or texture of your recipe. Whether you add it to your salad dressing, stir-fry or glass of water, each heaping teaspoon instantly adds five grams of fiber.

We hope that you found these “Advice on healthy eating” tips useful. We wanted to bring real eating healthy information to help get you started. Stay focus on your journey to improve your eating healthy habits!

P.S: If you are an expert on nutrition and would like to share more advice on healthy eating with our audience, send us a message. We welcome your comments, feedback and information. Stay healthy and happy!

Health Benefits And Nutrition Value of Vegetables




Curious about the health benefits and nutrition value of vegetables

You came to the right place cause here you will learn about the true health benefits and nutritionn value of vegetables. For some particular reason, why the vegetables never got eaten was forgotten but not eating them is a common theme among the smaller set.
As we aged the idea of not eating vegetables tended to go out the window, simply because we knew that we should eat vegetables. Unfortunately, the idea and the practice rarely went hand-in-hand. Adults are no less likely to eat their vegetables then they were as a child. They just hide it better by eating them when others were around to appear as healthy eaters. Those often sited “studies”, however, saw through to the true eating habits of adults and reported that, more often then not, you’re not eating your vegetables or at least not near enough.

How much to eat

Any reasonable person knows that the government guidelines and those studies are about as realistic as a child forgoing chocolate. The studies indicate the need for 4 cups (9 servings) of vegetables per day, based on a person needing 2,000 calories per day. To some this might sound like grazing rather then eating. Unfortunately, the studies do indicate time and again that these nutritional requirements are about the right levels for keeping a body in balance with regard to all the nutrients it needs to function properly.

Which nutrients are important?

All of the nutrients found in vegetables are important in one way or another. Each helps in the functioning of the body. Some, however, are a bit more important for particular body parts then others. All are important; it’s just that some are just more important. As far as the studies are concerned, they tend to look at: Potassium, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Calcium and Iron as the big ones to think about. There are other nutrients in vegetables that are just as important, but for the average person these are the big ones. Past the nutrients also consider that the Carbohydrates, fiber and proteins found in vegetables are important and things you need to consider in your vegetable and overall diet.

Why eat vegetables?

Vegetables have always been looked at as healthy food that is really good for our health and body. Consider that eating is like putting gas in your car. You need it to make the car go. Food is the gas for the body. Don’t eat it and you won’t go. Any food will do, it’s just that some gas blends are better then others. Put a low grade gas in your tank like McDonalds and eventually the engine is going to start running rough. Put a better grade fuel in your tank and the engine will run smoother without hick-ups. The problem is, every once and a while every engine gets hick-ups. Vegetables are a better grade of gas that helps to prevent hick-ups. From these studies that have been talked about, heart hick-ups are the area where vegetables have proven, through very reliable studies, to prevent hick-ups. There are other hick-ups where some have suggested that vegetables help with preventing hick-ups like cancer, but the very reliable studies cannot say 100%, or close to it, that this is so. The heart, however, is very reliably linked to vegetables and heart health.

Which vegetable to eat

Considering the number of vegetables found around the world and the way that they fit into differing regional cultures, it would be fairly difficult to list the seven best or worst vegetables and their nutrient values. What can be done is to pick seven vegetables that might represent seven types of vegetables, with particular nutrient values associated with them.

Leafy greens

This group of vegetables is the absolutely most important type of vegetable that a person could eat for overall health and general heart health. This is a hands down eat it every single day; the darker the leaf the better in a general sense. Heart health is where you will find the most benefit. There are many of these vegetables but Kale is the one most often mentioned from a nutritional, cooking and taste perspective to try. For 100g it has 450mg of potassium, 180% of recommended daily requirements (RDR) for vitamin A, 200% of RDR of vitamin C, 15% RDR of calcium and 19% of DRR of Iron.

Medium green bell pepper

The green bell pepper is a bit short on its calcium <2% RDR Calcium and 4% RDR of Iron but it is solid in Vitamin C with RDR of 180%. Potassium is at about mid-point at 210mg. 3 medium spears Broccoli Broccoli is also a bit short on Calcium and Iron because of its water composition at 4%RDR but is mid-pack on Potassium 300mg and 30%RDR vitamin A, at 140% RDR of vitamin C it is a bit higher then other vegetables. 1 medium carrot Carrots are a good vitamin source for potassium and vitamin A at 270mg of potassium and 270 RDR Vitamin A but low at 2% and 0% for Calcium and Iron respectively. 1 cup butternut squash Squash is above mid-pack with 4490mg Potassium, 220% RDR Vitamin A, 50% RDR Vitamin C and 6% RDR for Calcium and Iron. 3 medium Roma tomatoes Tomatoes are big on Potassium at 410mg and lower on other Vitamins and minerals at less then 60%RDR. As you can see, vegetables have great health benefits and good nutrition value in them. If you are out food shopping, remember to grab a few of these nutritious veggies and start getting into your health. if you want to get more nutrition facts on vegetables, see the nutrition chart for vegetables on the site below. Click Here --> Vegetable Nutrition Chart Link

Healthy Eating Information: Fruits and Vegetables For Better Health




Do you get healthy by eating more fruits and vegetables?

We all have heard at one time or another that eating more fruits and vegetables is actually good for our health. We also may have read that fruits and vegetables contain great nutrients like vitamins, minerals, anti-oxidants and much more. While it is common to see scientific studies on how health can be improved by using certain, particular supplements of vitamins and minerals it is not the same for the real McCoy. In other word, eating or drinking fresh fruits and vegetables for vitamins and minerals is way better than taking vitamins and minerals in a pill or capsule form.

How true? Ask yourself and do a goggle search (or a PUB Med or any advanced search of scientific articles) about how many times you see a study–any study–on a particular fruit or vegetable that comes out proving some health improvement. Not a group, but a particular fruit or vegetable. And proof of health, not disease (this is an important distinction).

We are talking about real science here not just made up stuff from some science nut or health nut. And we are talking about real fruits and vegetables like a particular apple or broccoli as opposed to a group of fruits or vegetables. In other words we are talking about something very concrete and not at all abstract–this is where real scientific study comes in very handy: such study is not abstract or it is not science. And, importantly, if I can prove it and you cannot, it is not scientifically provable. Period.

How many? Which vegetable? Which fruit?

There are plenty of promoters of eating fresh fruits and vegetables and many of them provide solid credentials like the Harvard, Tufts, Eat 5 a day, and so on (for a really good goggle search try vegetables and health or fruits and health).

For example, the Harvard site cites the latest dietary guidelines that, “call for five to thirteen servings of fruits and vegetables a day, depending on one’s caloric intake. For a person who needs 2,000 calories a day to maintain weight and health, this translates into nine servings, or 4½ cups per day.” The citation for this is The USDA, the U.S. Department of Agriculture. It is a helpful abstraction but not a particular guide to particular fruits and vegetables and how they can promote your health.

But most of what these prestigious institutions promote is air–no scientific studies demonstrating the health effects of a single fruit or vegetable could be found on the Harvard site, not one. True, it’s nice air, but air nevertheless.

Now we are not talking about the genuine research on fruits and vegetables like this one listed in Pub Med, “Electron beam and gamma irradiation effectively reduce Listeria monocytogenes populations on chopped romaine lettuce”, (J Food Prot. 2006 Mar;69(3):570-4, for those who need to know) . This kind of research is not after the health promoting effects of eating, in this case, romaine lettuce. And it does not pretend to be anything other than what it is.

Of course sites promoting the health benefits of eating of fruits and vegetables could be hiding the scientific studies and don’t want to bother their visitors with all those numbers and scientific names for turnips or plums. Or farmers who grow the really good stuff and how to buy them.

I remember a study concerning folate and green leafy vegetables and some kids on an island in the South Pacific. The study, a genuine scientific study, had to be halted because the scientists found that the children in the study could not get enough folate for their diets from the fresh vegetables because the vegetables themselves were deficient. So the study stopped because, ethically, depriving the children’s diet of this essential ingredient could hurt them–especially when the science proved the children would be deficient on a natural diet. So much for the health promoting benefits of this entire group of vegetables–and I have not seen another study to refute this single isolated, particular controlled scientific study on green leafy vegetable and exactly how they promote health in humans.

So how do you know if the fruits or vegetables you eat can really promote better health? Simple answer is you don’t. But then again, if you stopped eating fruits and vegetables what would happen? Could be all those diseases they write about in Pub Med and cited by the Tufts nutritionists and become the cover story about our fat nation for Time Magazine: eat your fruits and veggies and stay healthy or until we know, for sure, something different.