A Practical Approach To Healthy Eating

March 9, 2015 by  
Filed under Featured




I have been doing push-ups five days a week for over 25 years. My arms are pretty strong but it did not happen overnight. I did not do push-ups for a couple weeks or months and then stopped. I had to make push-ups a habit if I wanted to continuously get the results I have.

Exactly the same holds true with healthy eating. You will never be healthy, eating healthy foods occasionally. You have to make healthy eating a habit if you want to obtain nutritional health. People jump on the “band wagon” of healthy eating when they read books or view websites that talk about nutrition. While many of these books and websites tell you what you should eat in-order to be healthy, they fail to teach you how to make healthy eating a habit. Thus in a short period of time when temptations come, people fall right back into their old unhealthy eating habits.

What is a Habit? According to Webster’s dictionary a habit is “a behavior pattern acquired by frequent repetition or physiologic exposure that shows itself in regularity or increased facility of performance.”

Can you see that if we simply apply this principle to healthy eating we will be on our way to vibrant health?

Bad Eating Habits:

Bad eating habits do not develop overnight. For most people these habits began forming when they were kids. Thus one reason why many adults have a hard time breaking their bad eating habits is because these habits have been a part of their lifestyle for many years.

Why Do We Eat Food?

There are two main reasons why we eat food. One is to supply fuel for our body. The other reason is for pleasure. Unfortunately some of the foods that gives us pleasure are unhealthy.

Most people make their food selections based on what they see, smell or taste. Look at these three sentences: That pie sure looks good! That pie sure smells good! That pie sure taste good!

Notice that all three statements involve food and pleasure. However the food that is producing the pleasure (in this situation the pie) may or may not be good for you from a nutritional standpoint. That is why we need to be wise in our food selections and not simply leave it up to our sense of sight, taste or smell.

Eating Healthy Can Be Enjoyable:

Some people think of eating healthy as being boring and tasteless. I think that one reason they feel this way is because most of the commercial ads we see promote foods high in calories, fat, or sugar and only a small percentage of food advertising is done for fruits, vegetables, grains and beans. Thus if there was more nutritional education, more and more people would find eating healthy to be pleasurable and tasty.

How Healthy Eating Habits Changed My Life:

In 1998 my wife finally talked me into going to the doctor to get a check-up. I was not feeling sick but she clearly said that it was a good idea to get a yearly physical examination. Thank God I listened to her.

I have been athletic all my life. I run 18 miles a week. So when I went to the doctor I was not expecting to hear the bad news he gave me. He told me I had borderline diabetes.

Diabetes can be very dangerous if not treated. It is one of the leading cause of death in the United States. It is a disease of the pancreas that causes the body to stop producing the insulin it needs to regulate blood sugar.

My doctor told me that I did not need to be put on medication, however he suggested I start reading some books on healthy eating. That was the beginning of my path to healthy eating habits that turned my health situation around. Today I can honestly say that I am in excellent health. I feel great, I sleep great, people tell me that I do not look my age, I maintain a healthy weight, I do not take any type of medication, my blood pressure is normal, my blood sugar is normal, my cholesterol is normal, my immune system is strong, and the list goes on.

It is great to be in good health and I thank God for it. However I do not believe that I am healthy because of chance. I strongly believe that one main reason that I am healthy is because I take personal responsibility for my health. Making healthy eating a habit is a great part of this responsibility. Our physical bodies have laws that are governed by proper nutrition. If we violate these laws by consistently eating unhealthy foods, we are going to get sick.

Healthy Eating For Life

February 10, 2015 by  
Filed under Featured




We have all heard and read probably a thousand times about the importance of healthy eating. We have been encouraged time and time again to trade fast food meals for meals full of fruits and vegetables. For most of us, healthy eating is a matter of changing the habits we have carried for years. How amazing would it be if we did our children a favor and helped them to establish healthy eating patterns from the time of their birth?

I’m confident that the generation behind us would grow up much healthier and in much less need of major diet or fitness alterations in their adult years. The more we teach our children about the importance of healthy eating and the more we provide healthy options for them to eat, the better off they will be.

One of the biggest reasons that parents do not take the time to provide healthy meals for their children is lack of time. I mean really, who has the time to prepare a home cooked meal filled with fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins and whole grains every night? My suggestion to all busy parents is to realize how important the health of your children is. Only as you begin to make their health a priority will you fight for ways to provide healthy eating for them.

Establishing healthy eating patterns for children can be as simple as making some easy substitutions in your grocery shopping and menu planning. Trade whole milk for lowfat or skim milk and only get reduced fat yogurts or ice creams. Go for whole grain crackers and breads rather than filling your cart or their lunch boxes with potato chips or unhealthy snack crackers. Start their day off with healthy eating by only purchasing cereals and oatmeals that are low in sugar and high in essential vitamins and minerals.

Healthy eating is a matter of making better food choices. The next time your children beg you to get them fast food, do so only under the condition that they must choose from the healthier chicken or salad items on the menu. Look for ways to compromise as you bring healthy eating principles into your family. As the parent it is your responsibility to make sure that your children are developing healthy eating habits. There is no better time to do this than now. Your kids will thank you one day when they are still eating healthy as adults.

Tips and Tricks for Encouraging Healthy Eating Habits in Your Family

July 2, 2014 by  
Filed under Tips




Looking for healthy eating tips and tricks for your family?

Healthy eating is extremely important if we want to maintain and improve overall health. We have to really start to care about what we eat cause it matters. We may have heard or read this phrase before, “We are what we eat.” This is 100% correct. If we keep eating unhealthy food all the time, our health and body will reflect that; even when we do not see or feel it yet. On the other hand, if we choose to eat healthier food then our health and body will reflect that too, but in a good way. We will feel and look good as a result. We advise you to start a healthy eating journey with your family, sooner rather than later. We have some important tips and tricks you can use to encourage healthy eating habits in your family, starting today. These eating healthy tips and advice are easy to follow. If you have tried to enforce healthy eating habits in your family before and had no success, then this article will help you find new solutions. Read on to see our comprehensive list of ways to help your family make healthy eating a priority.

Healthy Eating Tips and Tricks:

1 Role Model –Your heath and weight directly effect your child’s health and weight. Children with just one overweight parent have a 25% risk of becoming an overweight or obese adult. If both parents are overweight the risk of becoming an overweight adult jumps to 50%.

2 Be Positive- No one enjoys receiving negative feedback. Talk to your child with compassion and encouragement. Instead of saying, ‘Lose weight’, say, ‘Let’s be healthy and start taking care of our bodies’. Focus on the foods you can eat, not the ones that you cannot. Say, ‘Let’s go pick out fruits and make a fruit salad,’ not ‘Don’t eat that.’

3 Make healthy eating a family affair – A family that eats together, eats better, according to a recent study in the journal Archives of Family Medicine. Children who report frequent family dinners have healthier diets than their peers who don’t, the study showed. Also fill your refrigerator and cabinets with fresh fruits, nuts, low-fat cheese, and things for everyone to snack on.

4 Eat Breakfast – A breakfast that consists of protein, starch and fat will keep your children more alert during school. Studies have shown that weight loss is much more difficult in people who skip breakfast. So remember to have a good breakfast cause it is the most important meal of the day.

5 Make time for physical activity – Make physical activity a family activity. Every night after dinner in the summer, go for a half-hour walk and make it an activity that kids look forward to. If you can afford it, enroll your kids in dancing or a sporting activity that they enjoy because they need to enjoy it to keep doing it. Or just turn on some dance music and have a dance party around the house.

6 Don’t say diet – Put your child on any diet and you are setting them up for an eating disorder – whether binge eating or closet eating or another type of disorder. Lifestyle changes have proven to be the most effective to lose weight and keep it off.

7 Avoid portion distortion – When serving the food try to portion out meal on dishes and avoid buffet-type or family-style eating. When exposed to so much food it is easy for your eyes to be bigger than your stomach. Resist the first temptation to have seconds then check in with yourself to see if you are really hungry.

We hope that you found this article helpful. Be sure to use our healthy eating tips and tricks to encourage your family’s eating habits. Our goal is to give you advice on healthy eating that you can actually use. If you enjoyed the information you found, share it with your family and friends. Stay healthy and happy! :)

Health Benefits And Nutrition Value of Vegetables

February 12, 2014 by  
Filed under Information




Curious about the health benefits and nutrition value of vegetables

You came to the right place cause here you will learn about the true health benefits and nutritionn value of vegetables. For some particular reason, why the vegetables never got eaten was forgotten but not eating them is a common theme among the smaller set.
As we aged the idea of not eating vegetables tended to go out the window, simply because we knew that we should eat vegetables. Unfortunately, the idea and the practice rarely went hand-in-hand. Adults are no less likely to eat their vegetables then they were as a child. They just hide it better by eating them when others were around to appear as healthy eaters. Those often sited “studies”, however, saw through to the true eating habits of adults and reported that, more often then not, you’re not eating your vegetables or at least not near enough.

How much to eat

Any reasonable person knows that the government guidelines and those studies are about as realistic as a child forgoing chocolate. The studies indicate the need for 4 cups (9 servings) of vegetables per day, based on a person needing 2,000 calories per day. To some this might sound like grazing rather then eating. Unfortunately, the studies do indicate time and again that these nutritional requirements are about the right levels for keeping a body in balance with regard to all the nutrients it needs to function properly.

Which nutrients are important?

All of the nutrients found in vegetables are important in one way or another. Each helps in the functioning of the body. Some, however, are a bit more important for particular body parts then others. All are important; it’s just that some are just more important. As far as the studies are concerned, they tend to look at: Potassium, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Calcium and Iron as the big ones to think about. There are other nutrients in vegetables that are just as important, but for the average person these are the big ones. Past the nutrients also consider that the Carbohydrates, fiber and proteins found in vegetables are important and things you need to consider in your vegetable and overall diet.

Why eat vegetables?

Vegetables have always been looked at as healthy food that is really good for our health and body. Consider that eating is like putting gas in your car. You need it to make the car go. Food is the gas for the body. Don’t eat it and you won’t go. Any food will do, it’s just that some gas blends are better then others. Put a low grade gas in your tank like McDonalds and eventually the engine is going to start running rough. Put a better grade fuel in your tank and the engine will run smoother without hick-ups. The problem is, every once and a while every engine gets hick-ups. Vegetables are a better grade of gas that helps to prevent hick-ups. From these studies that have been talked about, heart hick-ups are the area where vegetables have proven, through very reliable studies, to prevent hick-ups. There are other hick-ups where some have suggested that vegetables help with preventing hick-ups like cancer, but the very reliable studies cannot say 100%, or close to it, that this is so. The heart, however, is very reliably linked to vegetables and heart health.

Which vegetable to eat

Considering the number of vegetables found around the world and the way that they fit into differing regional cultures, it would be fairly difficult to list the seven best or worst vegetables and their nutrient values. What can be done is to pick seven vegetables that might represent seven types of vegetables, with particular nutrient values associated with them.

Leafy greens

This group of vegetables is the absolutely most important type of vegetable that a person could eat for overall health and general heart health. This is a hands down eat it every single day; the darker the leaf the better in a general sense. Heart health is where you will find the most benefit. There are many of these vegetables but Kale is the one most often mentioned from a nutritional, cooking and taste perspective to try. For 100g it has 450mg of potassium, 180% of recommended daily requirements (RDR) for vitamin A, 200% of RDR of vitamin C, 15% RDR of calcium and 19% of DRR of Iron.

Medium green bell pepper

The green bell pepper is a bit short on its calcium <2% RDR Calcium and 4% RDR of Iron but it is solid in Vitamin C with RDR of 180%. Potassium is at about mid-point at 210mg. 3 medium spears Broccoli Broccoli is also a bit short on Calcium and Iron because of its water composition at 4%RDR but is mid-pack on Potassium 300mg and 30%RDR vitamin A, at 140% RDR of vitamin C it is a bit higher then other vegetables. 1 medium carrot Carrots are a good vitamin source for potassium and vitamin A at 270mg of potassium and 270 RDR Vitamin A but low at 2% and 0% for Calcium and Iron respectively. 1 cup butternut squash Squash is above mid-pack with 4490mg Potassium, 220% RDR Vitamin A, 50% RDR Vitamin C and 6% RDR for Calcium and Iron. 3 medium Roma tomatoes Tomatoes are big on Potassium at 410mg and lower on other Vitamins and minerals at less then 60%RDR. As you can see, vegetables have great health benefits and good nutrition value in them. If you are out food shopping, remember to grab a few of these nutritious veggies and start getting into your health. if you want to get more nutrition facts on vegetables, see the nutrition chart for vegetables on the site below. Click Here --> Vegetable Nutrition Chart Link

Healthy Eating Information: Fruits and Vegetables For Better Health

January 13, 2014 by  
Filed under Information




Do you get healthy by eating more fruits and vegetables?

We all have heard at one time or another that eating more fruits and vegetables is actually good for our health. We also may have read that fruits and vegetables contain great nutrients like vitamins, minerals, anti-oxidants and much more. While it is common to see scientific studies on how health can be improved by using certain, particular supplements of vitamins and minerals it is not the same for the real McCoy. In other word, eating or drinking fresh fruits and vegetables for vitamins and minerals is way better than taking vitamins and minerals in a pill or capsule form.

How true? Ask yourself and do a goggle search (or a PUB Med or any advanced search of scientific articles) about how many times you see a study–any study–on a particular fruit or vegetable that comes out proving some health improvement. Not a group, but a particular fruit or vegetable. And proof of health, not disease (this is an important distinction).

We are talking about real science here not just made up stuff from some science nut or health nut. And we are talking about real fruits and vegetables like a particular apple or broccoli as opposed to a group of fruits or vegetables. In other words we are talking about something very concrete and not at all abstract–this is where real scientific study comes in very handy: such study is not abstract or it is not science. And, importantly, if I can prove it and you cannot, it is not scientifically provable. Period.

How many? Which vegetable? Which fruit?

There are plenty of promoters of eating fresh fruits and vegetables and many of them provide solid credentials like the Harvard, Tufts, Eat 5 a day, and so on (for a really good goggle search try vegetables and health or fruits and health).

For example, the Harvard site cites the latest dietary guidelines that, “call for five to thirteen servings of fruits and vegetables a day, depending on one’s caloric intake. For a person who needs 2,000 calories a day to maintain weight and health, this translates into nine servings, or 4½ cups per day.” The citation for this is The USDA, the U.S. Department of Agriculture. It is a helpful abstraction but not a particular guide to particular fruits and vegetables and how they can promote your health.

But most of what these prestigious institutions promote is air–no scientific studies demonstrating the health effects of a single fruit or vegetable could be found on the Harvard site, not one. True, it’s nice air, but air nevertheless.

Now we are not talking about the genuine research on fruits and vegetables like this one listed in Pub Med, “Electron beam and gamma irradiation effectively reduce Listeria monocytogenes populations on chopped romaine lettuce”, (J Food Prot. 2006 Mar;69(3):570-4, for those who need to know) . This kind of research is not after the health promoting effects of eating, in this case, romaine lettuce. And it does not pretend to be anything other than what it is.

Of course sites promoting the health benefits of eating of fruits and vegetables could be hiding the scientific studies and don’t want to bother their visitors with all those numbers and scientific names for turnips or plums. Or farmers who grow the really good stuff and how to buy them.

I remember a study concerning folate and green leafy vegetables and some kids on an island in the South Pacific. The study, a genuine scientific study, had to be halted because the scientists found that the children in the study could not get enough folate for their diets from the fresh vegetables because the vegetables themselves were deficient. So the study stopped because, ethically, depriving the children’s diet of this essential ingredient could hurt them–especially when the science proved the children would be deficient on a natural diet. So much for the health promoting benefits of this entire group of vegetables–and I have not seen another study to refute this single isolated, particular controlled scientific study on green leafy vegetable and exactly how they promote health in humans.

So how do you know if the fruits or vegetables you eat can really promote better health? Simple answer is you don’t. But then again, if you stopped eating fruits and vegetables what would happen? Could be all those diseases they write about in Pub Med and cited by the Tufts nutritionists and become the cover story about our fat nation for Time Magazine: eat your fruits and veggies and stay healthy or until we know, for sure, something different.